5 Common Myths About Sex That You Probably Still Believe In!

5 Common Myths About Sex That You Probably Still Believe In!

We all think we know things we don’t, but when it comes to sex being fuzzy can be sticky. Especially Between personal desires, dating norms, and physiological logistics, getting it on can be surprisingly complicated. Add in all the false information that’s floating around out there, and we’re all pretty much screwed!

There are lots of common misconceptions about sex that people probably believe and keep passing on for years and years. Interestingly, there are so many things that people know wrong about sex. You will be surprised when you know that some of the sex facts you learnt are originally myths, so just keep reading along the 5

Lesbians Can’t Transmit or Contract STIs

False. One self-identified lesbian in her mid-twenties told me that she had never been tested because lesbians could not contract STIs. In fact, sexually transmitted infections and diseases are passed along through skin-to-skin contact and bodily fluids like breast milk, secretions (from vaginas, penises, and anuses) and blood, which means anyone who’s kissing, licking or rubbing up against another naked person is putting themselves at some level of risk. Plus, because sexual orientation, sexual behavior and gender identity never have to align (and can change!), someone’s sexual orientation doesn’t designate the genitals of the person with whom they are (or have been) sexual. I am a queer/lesbian/dyke, and I have herpes. We’re much better off never making assumptions.

The G-Spot Is a Very Specific Spot

False. You can’t pull out an anatomical treasure map and hope that there’s an x that marks the g-spot. In reality, the G-spot is an area, not one specific spot. The stimulation of this area garners very different reactions in different people. Some people love it, some don’t. There’s nothing wrong with either response – they’re just different.

You Don’t Need Lube

False. Just because your or your partner’s vagina is lubricated doesn’t mean that you wouldn’t benefit from lube. Lube is always a good idea (as long as you’re using lube that is “body safe” and compatible with your body, barriers, and/or toys). No matter how wet you, or your partner, get, lube won’t feel bad (as long as you aren’t allergic to it). In fact, it’ll probably make sex that much better. Lube prevents micro-tears and helps to facilitate greater pleasure.

Anal Numbing Creams Help for Anal Sex

False. Some people want to use special creams to numb the anus before anal play. This is a terrible and dangerous idea. First, anal sex, when done properly, should not hurt. Second, if you numb up the area and are pushing things too far and being hurt, you won’t be able to feel it. This can cause real damage; overriding your body’s signals is never a good idea. Anal play isn’t right for everybody, and there are some circumstances when you should absolutely avoid it. If you want to try it, go slow and listen to your body. (Get some proper knowledge about What You Need to Know About Anal Sex.)

A Person’s Race Can Tell Us Something About Their Anatomy

False. And this is racist. For example, a black woman once picked up a dildo in the shop, admiring it. A couple of the people she was with were white, and proceeded to say, “Oh my god, you like that!? it’s huge! Well .. you are black. It does make sense.” I overheard this conversation and threw on my educator hat. I reminded them that all bodies have different preferences, and that vaginas are incredibly elastic. A person’s favorite lengths, widths, or dimensions in what penetrates them is very unique, and has nothing to do with race, gender, or sexual orientation.

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