epaselect epa04996471 Taiwanese workers wearing white masks lie down on a street during a protest outside a goverment office in Taipei, Taiwan, 26 October 2015. Protesters said that the government allegedly revised its hiring policy in 2012 and has laid off around 15,000 contracted and temporary employees. They also calls on candidates in the up-coming election to take care of workers interests.  EPA/RITCHIE B. TONGO

Most Dynamic And powerful ways people protested in 2015

One of the most common types of protests is a mass gathering, complete with handmade signs calling for change. But sticking to that format can limit the imagination — and activists have had enough of limits.

When it came to protesting in 2015, advocates proved that wherever there’s an issue, there’s a powerful way to tackle it. Savvy protesters used creativity as a tool to break through the noise, highlighting social and environmental causes in the most eye-catching ways.

 

 While every protest advocating for a just, sensitive and comprehensive issue is attention-worthy, there’s something undoubtedly special about a demonstration that demands to be noticed through innovative imagery.

Check out these efforts that powerfully made an impact this year.

1. G7 world leader balloons

G7 Summit

IMAGE: JOERG KOCH/GETTY

Activists installed balloons featuring portraits of world leaders ahead of the G7 Summit on June 5 in Munich, Germany, to bring attention to global poverty and inequality. The balloons were accompanied by a banner proclaiming, “Dear G7, Be more than hot air. Act now to end extreme poverty.”

2. Violence against women

TURKEY-CRIME-WOMEN-RIGHTS

IMAGE: ADEM ALTAN/AFP/GETTY

At a June 12 protest in Ankara, Turkey, activists showed solidarity by showing split photographs of student Özgecan Aslan and other Turkish women who were victims of violence. The demonstration fought against the country’s culture of violence against women, with outrage ignited by the death of Aslan, who was killed while resisting an attempted rape in February.

3. “Sì” for LGBTQ equality

Milan LGBT

IMAGE: ROBERTO FINIZIO/PACIFIC PRESS/LIGHTROCKET/GETTY

On June 26, 50,000 activists in Milan, Italy, took to the streets to call for wider rights for LGBTQ citizens. A sea of signs with the word “Sì” represented the protesters saying “Yes” to equality with one simple, united message.

4. Blood Mirror art protest

blood mirror

IMAGE: PROVIDED BY JORDAN EAGLES

In June, artist Jordan Eagles debuted his newest artwork, Blood Mirror — a sculpture made of the blood of nine men who have sex with men. The art piece was made as a statement against the FDA mandated blood ban in the U.S., which stated that any man who had sex with a man since 1977 (the beginning of the AIDS epidemic) was barred from blood donation. The glass sculpture, at a towering seven feet tall, was displayed around the country in 2015 to advocate for the repeal of the discriminatory ban. This photo was taken in Trinity Church in New York City.

The ban on blood donations was reduced on Dec. 21 to require men who have sex with men to abstain from sex for one year in order to donate.

5. Running of the Bulls

Spain Bullfighting Protest

IMAGE: ALVARO BARRIENTOS/ASSOCIATED PRESS

Animal rights activists protested the famous San Fermín festival in Pamplona, Spain — more commonly known as the “Running of the Bulls” — in July. Activists painted themselves red, lying down on the streets of Pamplona to call for an end to the historic event, which they claim harms and abuses the bulls involved.

6. A painted sun around the Arc de Triomphe

Paris Greenpeace Arc de Triomphe

IMAGE: SIPA/ASSOCIATED PRESS

Greenpeace activists created a sun around the Arc de Triomphe, a famous Parisian landmark, during the U.N. Climate Summit in Paris on Dec. 11. Protesters, who had been demonstrating around the city for the 12-day duration of the climate talks, spilled yellow washable paint along the streets using bicycles, allowing passing cars to spread the dye along the streets.

7. Black Lives Matter “die-ins”

Die In Black Lives Matter

IMAGE: SCOTT OLSON/GETTY

For Black Lives Matter protesters, there’s power in the rawness and urgency of their message — and unapologetic visbility. Throughout the year, protesters from the movement organized mass “die-ins” across the country to protest police brutality and violence. The particular protest pictured above was especially impactful, taking place in Ferguson, Missouri, on Aug. 9 — the one-year anniversary of the death of Michael Brown.

Die-ins are not exclusive to the Black Lives Matter movement — in fact, they’re a somewhat common protesting method. But the message these protesters sent is particularly powerful when applied to a movement centered around the mass killings of people of color by law enforcement.

8. Empty shoes as climate activism

Climate Change Shoes

IMAGE: PATRICK AVENTURIER/GETTY

Activists and advocates neatly placed thousands of pairs of shoes in Paris’ Place de la Republique on Nov. 30 in a protest coinciding with the beginning of the U.N. Climate Summit in Paris. In the aftermath of deadly terror attacks in the city on Nov. 13, French officials banned large-scale protests.

To still make a mark in the absence of actual activists, protesters sent their shoes to be placed at the square, each pair representing a person in support of a comprehensive and impactful climate agreement. The shoes included those of Pope Francis and a pair for U.N. Secretary-General Ban Ki Moon.

9. Taiwanese government workers protest

Taiwanese workers protest in Taipei

IMAGE: EPA/RITCHIE B. TONGO

Taiwanese workers wearing white masks lay in the street during a protest outside a government office in Taipei, Taiwan, on Oct. 26. Activists protested the government’s treatment of workers, including mass layoffs to contracted and temporary employees. Protesters lying in the street spelled out “Give back annual salary” in Chinese, and their white masks symbolized the silence of workers.

10 . Migrants’ mouths sewn shut

Greece Migrants

IMAGE: GIANNIS PAPANIKOS/ASSOCIATED PRESS

Migrants and refugees sewed their mouths shut in “no man’s land” during a protest on Nov. 23 on the border of Greece and Macedonia. They were left in limbo at the border after several European countries declared they would only allow “war-zone refugees” from Afghanistan, Iraq and Syria to pass through their countries.

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